Friday, June 14, 2013

Sgt. Damon's Art



What would you do if you lost both of your arms?

Sgt. Pete Damon became an artist. And a damn good one, too.




In October of 2003, while serving as a helicopter mechanic in Iraq, Pete Damon lost both arms.






Since that time, he has made truly beautiful paintings.





Guys like Pete Damon amaze me. I have both of my arms. I couldn't do work this beautiful if you gave me 100 years and private lessons with a master. Pete does it with a prosthesis and his natural God-given talent.

 Here he is, at work.




His story - which you can read more about at his blog (and at stories done about him in publications such as The Boston Globe, TIME, and others, to which there are links at his place) - is courageous and heartwarming, but arms or no arms, the guy is just plain GOOD.



Within three months of losing his arms, he took up painting. He had drawn before, but now painting,“became my therapy,” Damon says. “It really uplifted me. It lit a spark. It has really evolved from therapy to a passion that consumes most of my time.” It's time well-spent, wouldn't you say?




 In January 2009, he presented one of his paintings to President George W. Bush. The painting of a soldier saluting the president from a wheelchair reflected Damon’s own views. “I told him I had no regrets. I think I’m a better person because of my military experience,” Damon says.





 I think I'm a better person for having found out about Sgt. Pete Damon.

Please visit Sgt. Damon's blog. His paintings are for sale. If you're not in a position to buy one, why not do the world a favor and feature him and his artwork on your blog, as I've done here?




Thanks for your service, Sergeant. And thanks for making my day a better one via your art.




Oh, one last thought: Before his injuries, Damon was right-handed. He has accomplished all of this as a lefty.

Soon, with more better stuff.


27 comments:

Ami said...

That guy is pretty good! Thanks for sharing his story. :)

I hope your story is going along okay, too.

Buck said...

Wow... just wow. Thanks for this, Jim.

Karen said...

Finally, a post that's not about sports :) Beautiful paintings... off to his blog...

Sandy Kessler said...

very compelling artwork

Anonymous said...

Thanks sully I owe u one 44

joeh said...

I added this link to my post today, as this is a great example of the "It's Doable" spirit!

OldAFSarge said...

Superb Suldog! Will link to the good Sergeant and I'll gen up a post. Or link to yours, maybe both.

lime said...

wow, just wow! that's impressive on so many levels! thank you for sharing this with us all. it's just the kind of inspiration i need right now to keep myself positive (not feeling like i'm struggling in that regard, just wanting to surround myself with positive things in order to maintain is all)

Hilary said...

This is the art of a beautiful soul. He's an inspiration for all. His painting of father and son touches me. Thanks for featuring him and for inviting me over for a look.

Michelle H. said...

Absolutely beautiful artwork!

CLR said...

I am particularly emotional, having just lost my grandfather - WW II veteran, but this is simply beautiful. We really have no excuses, and no reason to whine.

Thank you. Thank you for sharing this.

Judi FitzPatrick said...

Wow, thanks for sharing this amazing story.

The paintings are wonderful; I will find some way to share.

Peace, Judi

P.S. Thanks for stopping by my blog today - happy Flag Day!

SueAnn Lommler said...

Oh my gosh!! He is amazing!! Thanks for giving me the heads up! His work is fabulous
Hugs
SueAnn

Jenny Woolf said...

That's amazing. The pictures remind me a little bit of Hopper. What intrigues me is that he managed to do this as a lefty. I wonder if he has been assessed neurologically, it sounds like one of those things that sometimes happens when someone gets a brain injury and it unleashes hidden talents. I am so glad that he has found success and fame through creativity, it is the best thing really to be creative but it is not a gift everyone is lucky enough to have. Thanks for letting us know about him. I'll do a facebook link.

Clare said...

Thank you, Sgt. Damon, and thank you, Sully, for keeping me in your thoughts. I will, indeed, share this gentleman's wonderful artwork with my friends.
xoxoxo, cd

Tabor said...

This man is certainly talented. I wonder if his talent would have been nurtured if he had returned without physical or mental disabilities. It is such romantic work and he deserves all the praise he is due. I will link on my FB page...not that I have many friends, but my friends have freinds and so on and so on!

The Geezers said...

Amazing story. We should reflect on this anytime we're feeling a little down-trodden.

Along These Lines ... said...

Triumph out of tragedy.

Joanna Jenkins said...

Tears in my eyes... What a fabulous story. Blessings to Damon. Thanks for sharing his story.
jj

Maggie May said...

This man is a wonderful example of how things can be overcome. His work is wonderful. I moan about painful arthritis..... this man has much more to contend with and is getting on in life far better than a person with two arms. Makes me ashamed.
Maggie x

Nuts in May

Three Hundred Sixty Five said...

His art is remarkable ~ but not as remarkable as the man itself, which adds glory to his paintings.
(Thanks for visiting me, Sully)

Juli said...

Fantastic. Just amazing. I'll have to pop on over.

Absolut Ruiness said...

People like him bring things into perspective for you. Thanks for introducing him to us.

Absolut Ruiness said...

And by "you" i mean "us". I don't mean that its just you who has a out of focus perspective.

Char said...

Amazing! Thanks fot posting this.

Barbara said...

He is amazing! Every time I start to make an excuse about why I can't do this or that, I'm going to remember him. Thanks for bringing his story to us!

Jeni said...

Incredible and AWESOME! Thanks so much for sharing this, Jim.